Become a member and get exclusive access to articles, videos and more!
Start Your Free Trial

Naomi Ito

Published:

Since I was young I have played the piano, and I also love practicing calligraphy. I think these items combined have led to my treasuring watercolor painting. When I hear a pleasant sound, I want to change it to the tone of the colors.

I had been making works and portfolios hoping to become a picture book creator when I graduated from university. During this time, a friend passed along one of my portfolios to KOKKA, a Japanese fabric manufacturer, and they asked if I would design textiles for them. This was a turning point for me. I was not sure if I should try this, but my mom told me that my grandfather had been a textile designer, so I decided to move forward as well in this field.

Naomi Ito

Fresh, clear light generated in the quiet moment of mornings regularly provides me with inspiration.

When practicing my craft, I first draw paintings and then, design it as a textile. Designing textiles is like creating collages of watercolor paintings. The motifs I choose to create come from daily life such as intangible things—the sense of air, gradation of light and mist, or what I grow myself— flowers and fruits.

I make photocopies of my first drawings in color, and then, cut and paste them onto a big piece of paper spread out on my desk. As I imagine what is a comfortable rhythm when we wear it or touch it, I paste and redraw the paintings. I continue working and am excited about the new look and feel made with each painting.

Today, my family owns a small organic orchard and also grows herbs at the feet of the trees. their daily growth and generated color both fascinate and motivate me to move my paintbrushes.

My goal is to shape sparks of inspiration into the textile from the beginning to the finish, trying not to hold back my true feelings. I view paintings like a gift that makes me happy when I touch it.

And, when I draw, I always prepare tea. I enjoy teatime as it’s artistic, and the quiet time experienced along with it is very important to me. I condition my heart as I choose and prepare tea leaves according to the setting or condition of the day, then I start drawing. Sometimes, I invite my friends to have a tea party. I also prepare tea when I have meetings with textile staff . One of my dreams is to travel with my family to places I have never been to before and have an exhibition of my textiles. It would be wonderful to have teatime with people gathered for me.

Naomi Ito

“Itoshii” which means lovely, endearing, beloved.

Over the past seven years, I have continued to make new clothing patterns at our studio, “Atelier to Nani Iro,” where I have accumulated a collection of patterns. I have pulled these together within one book— The Nani Iro Sewing Studio—so that people who have never been to the Atelier can enjoy the patterns, and also, for those who already have seen Nani Iro can enjoy it again at hand. The book delivers not only our works but also our images and imaginations.

Since I was young I have played the piano, and I also love practicing calligraphy. I think these items combined have led to my treasuring watercolor painting. When I hear a pleasant sound, I want to change it to the tone of the colors.

I had been making works and portfolios hoping to become a picture book creator when I graduated from university. During this time, a friend passed along one of my portfolios to KOKKA, a Japanese fabric manufacturer, and they asked if I would design textiles for them. This was a turning point for me. I was not sure if I should try this, but my mom told me that my grandfather had been a textile designer, so I decided to move forward as well in this field.

Naomi Ito

Fresh, clear light generated in the quiet moment of mornings regularly provides me with inspiration.

When practicing my craft, I first draw paintings and then, design it as a textile. Designing textiles is like creating collages of watercolor paintings. The motifs I choose to create come from daily life such as intangible things—the sense of air, gradation of light and mist, or what I grow myself— flowers and fruits.

I make photocopies of my first drawings in color, and then, cut and paste them onto a big piece of paper spread out on my desk. As I imagine what is a comfortable rhythm when we wear it or touch it, I paste and redraw the paintings. I continue working and am excited about the new look and feel made with each painting.

Today, my family owns a small organic orchard and also grows herbs at the feet of the trees. their daily growth and generated color both fascinate and motivate me to move my paintbrushes.

My goal is to shape sparks of inspiration into the textile from the beginning to the finish, trying not to hold back my true feelings. I view paintings like a gift that makes me happy when I touch it.

And, when I draw, I always prepare tea. I enjoy teatime as it’s artistic, and the quiet time experienced along with it is very important to me. I condition my heart as I choose and prepare tea leaves according to the setting or condition of the day, then I start drawing. Sometimes, I invite my friends to have a tea party. I also prepare tea when I have meetings with textile staff . One of my dreams is to travel with my family to places I have never been to before and have an exhibition of my textiles. It would be wonderful to have teatime with people gathered for me.

Naomi Ito

“Itoshii” which means lovely, endearing, beloved.

Over the past seven years, I have continued to make new clothing patterns at our studio, “Atelier to Nani Iro,” where I have accumulated a collection of patterns. I have pulled these together within one book— The Nani Iro Sewing Studio—so that people who have never been to the Atelier can enjoy the patterns, and also, for those who already have seen Nani Iro can enjoy it again at hand. The book delivers not only our works but also our images and imaginations.