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Aurélie Mathigot

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I am a visual artist who enjoys taking sewing to the next level, making enchanting furniture and accessories. I embroider, knit, stitch and crochet coverings for daily objects.

I started working with textiles after completing a course in the history of art. I was very inspired by the theme ‘rediscovery’—a theme that offers objects to be expressed in a new way; a theme that protects those subjects and gives it a new identity. I found I was able to express this theme with crochet, knitting and embroidery.

Aurélie Mathigot Portrait

These techniques are practiced across the world, so during my travels, I am afforded the opportunity to meet people through these crafts, and we are able to exchange, learn and create together. From Brazil to Mexico—also in Calais, the city of lace and le Mac Val (Vitry-sur-Seine)—I re-design ateliers and bring different people and generations together, from young children to the elderly. This has resulted in quite a few different locations in the world where poetic and inspirational work is produced together—all based on participation and exchange.

My home is located in a former factory, hidden like a precious gem, at the end of a long dead-end street in the heart of Paris, far away from the daily life of France’s capital. Twelve years ago, it was an abandoned office building. It was surrounded by spooky ateliers, and I really wondered if I was prepared to live there. But, I decided to take on the challenge to turn the location into a comfortable home for living and working. I bought a part of the factory along with a handful of other pioneers, each purchasing our own piece of the industrial building. Every one of us created our own space, often in combination with an atelier or studio for working.

Walking into my space (once you have crossed the small garden and have climbed the five wonky steps) you will find my kitchen with a connecting living room. Wall colours throughout are of soft powdery tones, such as grey-blue, taupe and soft pink. I don’t like colours to be too expressive in my interior. My aim is to create a calm and serene interior for all seasons. I like to experience my home as a refugee, protecting me from the hectic lifestyle of the big city out there and yet so near.

‘Protection’ is also one of my favourite themes in my work as a designer. I cover daily objects with wool, pearls and lace— creating wrappings that transform and protect. I believe it is an expression of a second skin which changes the reality and surprises the viewer.

Aurélie Mathigot Sewn Chair

 

I love going on treasure hunts for special objects, which then fill up my home. I blow new life into each of them. For example, I might paint a vintage leather chair, upholster a sofa and armchair in my own personal way and turn an object upside down for a new perspective, letting them all flow together to form my own creation.

It feels like every part of my home is a different storybook. This is probably why people often feel at home here and can’t stop looking around them. People often find it calming and inspiring to be here.

“Art is an expression of the idea of recovery and the need for talking about everyday objects in another, new way. These objects start telling us a new story.” — Aurélie Mathigot

I am a visual artist who enjoys taking sewing to the next level, making enchanting furniture and accessories. I embroider, knit, stitch and crochet coverings for daily objects.

I started working with textiles after completing a course in the history of art. I was very inspired by the theme ‘rediscovery’—a theme that offers objects to be expressed in a new way; a theme that protects those subjects and gives it a new identity. I found I was able to express this theme with crochet, knitting and embroidery.

Aurélie Mathigot Portrait

These techniques are practiced across the world, so during my travels, I am afforded the opportunity to meet people through these crafts, and we are able to exchange, learn and create together. From Brazil to Mexico—also in Calais, the city of lace and le Mac Val (Vitry-sur-Seine)—I re-design ateliers and bring different people and generations together, from young children to the elderly. This has resulted in quite a few different locations in the world where poetic and inspirational work is produced together—all based on participation and exchange.

My home is located in a former factory, hidden like a precious gem, at the end of a long dead-end street in the heart of Paris, far away from the daily life of France’s capital. Twelve years ago, it was an abandoned office building. It was surrounded by spooky ateliers, and I really wondered if I was prepared to live there. But, I decided to take on the challenge to turn the location into a comfortable home for living and working. I bought a part of the factory along with a handful of other pioneers, each purchasing our own piece of the industrial building. Every one of us created our own space, often in combination with an atelier or studio for working.

Walking into my space (once you have crossed the small garden and have climbed the five wonky steps) you will find my kitchen with a connecting living room. Wall colours throughout are of soft powdery tones, such as grey-blue, taupe and soft pink. I don’t like colours to be too expressive in my interior. My aim is to create a calm and serene interior for all seasons. I like to experience my home as a refugee, protecting me from the hectic lifestyle of the big city out there and yet so near.

‘Protection’ is also one of my favourite themes in my work as a designer. I cover daily objects with wool, pearls and lace— creating wrappings that transform and protect. I believe it is an expression of a second skin which changes the reality and surprises the viewer.

Aurélie Mathigot Sewn Chair

 

I love going on treasure hunts for special objects, which then fill up my home. I blow new life into each of them. For example, I might paint a vintage leather chair, upholster a sofa and armchair in my own personal way and turn an object upside down for a new perspective, letting them all flow together to form my own creation.

It feels like every part of my home is a different storybook. This is probably why people often feel at home here and can’t stop looking around them. People often find it calming and inspiring to be here.

“Art is an expression of the idea of recovery and the need for talking about everyday objects in another, new way. These objects start telling us a new story.” — Aurélie Mathigot