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Lizzie Snow fortyonehundred

Published:

an introduction

Hi! My name is Lizzie Snow. I am a visual artist working under my artist name, fortyonehundred. Inspired by fractals in nature, I create contemporary explorations of the mandala and free-flowing artworks. 

I’ll share with you an overview of my work before we dive into the process and behind the scenes. My credentials include a Master of Fine Arts degree, a Bachelor of Design degree, over 150,000 followers online, numerous high-profile collaborations, and significant media coverage. 

I have collaborated with Apple, Whittaker’s, Blunt Umbrellas, lululemon, Converse, Peugeot, Allbirds, Topshop, Roy Henry Vickers, and more. I was a lululemon ambassador in 2017 & 2018. 

I filmed an online course with Domestika recently in New York, titled “How to Draw a Mandala,” and I have more courses coming up: one on advanced mandala painting, and one on how to transform your art into your business. 

The mediums I engage in include original artworks, internationally commissioned hand-painted murals, limited-edition prints & collectables, weekly video content, and collaborations with select brands and artists worldwide. 

After having spent the past three years in Canada, I have now returned to New Zealand to continue advancing my career. I go back and forth between the two countries and travel for commissions frequently. 

“The mandala is an archetypal image whose occurrence is attested throughout the ages. It signifies the wholeness of the Self. This circular image represents the wholeness of the psychic ground or, to put it in mythic terms, the divinity incarnate in man.”

— Carl Jung

how I started

I’ve been drawing and painting since I was a child, but it only became a disciplined practice later in my teenage years. I eventually began drawing every night and started posting and selling my creations on social media. People started to notice, and from there, it took off. That’s the short story!

At age 18, I founded my artist name and business, fortyonehundred. I have been a full-time artist for many years now, and I couldn’t be more grateful and appreciative to be on this journey. 

For the first couple of years, I worked two days a week in art galleries. It was a great way to top up my art income and develop relationships in the industry, as well as implement some structure into otherwise blurry weeks.

Fast forward to now—I have a thriving art business and have collaborated with some of the biggest brands in the world. I encourage people to strive for their biggest, wildest dreams. Those opportunities are out there, but you have to create them. You have to carve out your own unique path and make it happen.

what do I create?

I create and sell my art in lots of different forms. The way I visualise my offerings is through a few distinct categories. Let me explain. 

As well as still selling my drawings, I also have paintings, wood burnings, paper cuts, ink drawings, and murals. Then I produce prints and products from my most successful artworks. 

Products include sterling silver jewellery, glass and bamboo bottles, journaling notebooks, tote bags—all sorts!

Another category is “artist tools,” which includes Mural Pens, XL compasses, daily planners, and other artist supplies.

Mural Pens are my own brand of paint pens, made from a special blend of acrylic paint, designed to have the perfect flow on walls, wood, canvas, and more. It’s been incredible being able to produce a premium art supply and having so many repeat customers with glowing reviews. I paint all my murals with Mural Pens.

I’ve also started to teach weekly YouTube videos on art & art business and also one-on-one video “mentor” calls to help guide artists on their own careers. I then have online courses I teach with Domestika: “How to draw a mandala”; “How to transform your art into your career”; and “Advanced mandala painting”.

It’s been great diving into teaching as I feel like I have a lot to share: both the creative and spiritual side of art, as well as encouraging other artists how they can have a thriving career from their creative pursuits. 

Collaboration is a big part of my practice as an artist. The collaborations are all quite different because they’re all very one-off designed events. 

Examples include a large number of unique collaborations with companies in each category in a variety of techniques, including: live painting (Converse, Topshop, +), limited-edition products sold around the world (Blunt Umbrella, Garage Project, LilyBee, +), social media content creation (Sakura of America, Apple, SkillShare, +), mural painting (lululemon, Westfield, +), and a car wrapped in my art (Peugeot). 

I’ve had 10+ exhibitions in galleries, but I mostly focus on showcasing and selling online. Social media has been a fantastic way to engage with collectors, fans, and other artists: 100k+ followers on Instagram and 50k+ spread across TikTok, YouTube, Facebook, and other platforms. I put in a lot of work to my social media, but I also feel very lucky. 

my art studio

The art studio is where you can find me almost all the time—drawing, painting, computer work, packaging online orders, designing new products, social media content creation, planning upcoming projects, murals, and collaborations. 

I’ve set up seven studios since beginning my business; each has been very different. They’ve ranged from a small corner of a bedroom to a shared studio with other artists to a proper gallery storefront, and recently I transformed a large room into my dream art studio. 

There are some quirks in this new space — like the pool table that was too heavy to move. I converted it into a standing desk by putting a plank of wood on top. Underneath is a treadmill so I can walk while doing my emails. 

The studio is set up with lots of specific areas — desk spaces, product stock and print storage, spaces for messy paint and fine drawings, an easel corner. … If you’re interested in seeing, I uploaded two videos about it to YouTube. One is the beginning-to-end process showing setting up the studio from scratch. The second is a studio tour where I show you around the entire space.

“Each person’s life is like a mandala — a vast, limitless circle. We stand in the center of our own circle, and everything we see, hear, and think forms the mandala of our life.”

— Pema Chodron

The last 11 years, I’ve had the absolute honour of having my little dog, George. This past year, he died from a veterinary surgical accident. It was awful … I’ve only just started to recover and reemerge. George was a 5-kg (11 lbs.) toy poodle. He was an amazing little creature. Loved an adventure but mostly just wanted to cuddle! He spent every day in the art studio with me, and he loved his glamorous life of being a pampered art assistant. 

We travelled the world together; I took him everywhere with me, and he was comfortable travelling on planes, cars, boats. Wherever we went, he was happy! I’m heartbroken, but I feel lucky to have had those wonderful 11 years of unconditional love and joy. Give your fluffy babies an extra hug. 

the art meaning

I create contemporary explorations of the mandala and free-flowing artworks. My artwork is inspired by fractals in nature, the ever-repeating patterns found all throughout the natural universe. 

To understand fractals, you can visualise the patterns of a lightning strike and then draw similarities to a branching tree, the nerves in our bodies, and interweaving rivers. 

Once you start noticing these patterns, they start showing up everywhere, reminding us of the connection between the pattern of our skin to that of tree bark to the makeup of our social systems and so forth. 

Fractal patterning allows us to visualise the unbreakable and immense interconnection of humans and nature. A fusion of art, science, nature, mathematics, and people. 

The mandala is one of the most universal symbols that exist in our world  throughout almost all ethnicities and across centuries of art, culture, architecture, science, and, of course, in nature. Cultural examples include the Celtic knots, North American dream catchers, Aztec calendars, and European church windows, to name a few. Natural occurrences include snowflakes, cross-sections of fruit, planets, the iris of the eye, cacti, flower centres, and thousands of other examples.

the art creation

When creating a contemporary exploration of the mandala, I start with a blank page. Using a pencil, ruler, compass (and eraser!), I create a geometric template of lines and circles to be the drawing guide. The more accurate this base is, the better the drawing is. I start in pencil from the centre, sketching shapes, which evolve upon the canvas into an intricate mandala. Once I’m happy with the pencil, I go back with ink and/or sometimes paint, too.

The mandala is characterised by scaling, symmetry, repetition, and circularity. My free-flowing work contrasts this by being freed from any restraints. Still the same essence of shape, pattern, and flow—but spiraling in and out from each other with no rules or boundaries. I love these two practices; they complement each other in a way that lets me explore different creative techniques while still creating a cohesive body of work. 

Mural painting has been a lot of fun. The biggest I’ve painted so far is a 30m painting (98 ft). I was commissioned to paint this in New Zealand, while I was living in Canada. The commission was for five murals, which took six weeks. Being flown all over the world was a goal I had set for my art and career, and I’m still pinching myself that it’s now my reality. 

The iPad Pro has been really helpful to mock up murals, which helps me book clients, as well as drawing sections onto photos of artworks before committing with paint. I’m constantly using my iPhone and MacBook, and they’re a huge part of my art and business. Massive Apple fan here!

advice to other artists

Let’s talk about the romanticisation of being an artist—of course, there are magical experiences and lifestyles that can be lived. But to get there, there are years of blood, sweat, and tears. Countless hours. Lots of instability. Letdowns. Sacrifices. Mental health struggles. When I share the fabulous things I get to do, I think it’s important to speak about the downsides, which are very much part of the same reality.

Art business is complex—but achievable. What I love about focusing on art business is how it engages both sides of your mind. My art mind is full of soul and spirit, no awareness of time. It is egoless, expressive, fulfilling, and deeply emotional. My business mind is strategic, goal-orientated, and fast paced. 

When your art business is supporting you financially, your mind is released from the basic stresses of money, leading to you having more time for creating and making art. It’s cyclical! It’s incredibly motivating when people are interested in purchasing your art; it allows you to continue to innovate as an artist and entrepreneur. 

Every day, I make time for learning, observing, thinking, and creating. This conscious dedication to growth enables my art to continue to evolve and grow through my passions and interests. What does that look like for me? Yoga, reading, visiting art galleries, journaling, taking online courses, caring for my body and mind. My advice to you is to pursue your goals, look after yourself, and persevere every day.

“We should learn to see everyday life as mandala—the luminous fringes of experience which radiate spontaneously from the empty nature of our being. The aspects of our mandala are the day-to-day objects of our life experience
moving in the dance or play
of the universe.”

— Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

hopes, dreams, goals, fears.

In terms of goals, I am so happy with where I am in my art career. I hope to be able to continue this path … but always dreaming to keep going bigger! 

I want to keep developing the concepts in my art and create more intricate and larger artworks. I want to expand the range of my prints and products, keep collaborating with big brands, paint massive murals on buildings, and continue to challenge the idea of what reality can be. I want to share with you, too—so I’ll keep filming and posting weekly videos and produce more online courses. 

What I’m fearful of? I’m scared of losing my work ethic and drive. I don’t really know where it comes from, but I sure hope that it carries on! 

thank you!

Thank you to the team and readers at WHAT Women Create for including me in your magazine! What an amazing place to learn about other creative women.

I’d love to connect with you all! Follow me on social media @fortyonehundred (Instagram, YouTube, TikTok, etc.). Check out my portfolio and online courses on my website: www.fortyonehundred.com.

 

Lizzie Snow Dream Art Studio Tour 2022

Lizzie Snow Art Studio Tour 2021

an introduction

Hi! My name is Lizzie Snow. I am a visual artist working under my artist name, fortyonehundred. Inspired by fractals in nature, I create contemporary explorations of the mandala and free-flowing artworks. 

I’ll share with you an overview of my work before we dive into the process and behind the scenes. My credentials include a Master of Fine Arts degree, a Bachelor of Design degree, over 150,000 followers online, numerous high-profile collaborations, and significant media coverage. 

I have collaborated with Apple, Whittaker’s, Blunt Umbrellas, lululemon, Converse, Peugeot, Allbirds, Topshop, Roy Henry Vickers, and more. I was a lululemon ambassador in 2017 & 2018. 

I filmed an online course with Domestika recently in New York, titled “How to Draw a Mandala,” and I have more courses coming up: one on advanced mandala painting, and one on how to transform your art into your business. 

The mediums I engage in include original artworks, internationally commissioned hand-painted murals, limited-edition prints & collectables, weekly video content, and collaborations with select brands and artists worldwide. 

After having spent the past three years in Canada, I have now returned to New Zealand to continue advancing my career. I go back and forth between the two countries and travel for commissions frequently. 

“The mandala is an archetypal image whose occurrence is attested throughout the ages. It signifies the wholeness of the Self. This circular image represents the wholeness of the psychic ground or, to put it in mythic terms, the divinity incarnate in man.”

— Carl Jung

how I started

I’ve been drawing and painting since I was a child, but it only became a disciplined practice later in my teenage years. I eventually began drawing every night and started posting and selling my creations on social media. People started to notice, and from there, it took off. That’s the short story!

At age 18, I founded my artist name and business, fortyonehundred. I have been a full-time artist for many years now, and I couldn’t be more grateful and appreciative to be on this journey. 

For the first couple of years, I worked two days a week in art galleries. It was a great way to top up my art income and develop relationships in the industry, as well as implement some structure into otherwise blurry weeks.

Fast forward to now—I have a thriving art business and have collaborated with some of the biggest brands in the world. I encourage people to strive for their biggest, wildest dreams. Those opportunities are out there, but you have to create them. You have to carve out your own unique path and make it happen.

what do I create?

I create and sell my art in lots of different forms. The way I visualise my offerings is through a few distinct categories. Let me explain. 

As well as still selling my drawings, I also have paintings, wood burnings, paper cuts, ink drawings, and murals. Then I produce prints and products from my most successful artworks. 

Products include sterling silver jewellery, glass and bamboo bottles, journaling notebooks, tote bags—all sorts!

Another category is “artist tools,” which includes Mural Pens, XL compasses, daily planners, and other artist supplies.

Mural Pens are my own brand of paint pens, made from a special blend of acrylic paint, designed to have the perfect flow on walls, wood, canvas, and more. It’s been incredible being able to produce a premium art supply and having so many repeat customers with glowing reviews. I paint all my murals with Mural Pens.

I’ve also started to teach weekly YouTube videos on art & art business and also one-on-one video “mentor” calls to help guide artists on their own careers. I then have online courses I teach with Domestika: “How to draw a mandala”; “How to transform your art into your career”; and “Advanced mandala painting”.

It’s been great diving into teaching as I feel like I have a lot to share: both the creative and spiritual side of art, as well as encouraging other artists how they can have a thriving career from their creative pursuits. 

Collaboration is a big part of my practice as an artist. The collaborations are all quite different because they’re all very one-off designed events. 

Examples include a large number of unique collaborations with companies in each category in a variety of techniques, including: live painting (Converse, Topshop, +), limited-edition products sold around the world (Blunt Umbrella, Garage Project, LilyBee, +), social media content creation (Sakura of America, Apple, SkillShare, +), mural painting (lululemon, Westfield, +), and a car wrapped in my art (Peugeot). 

I’ve had 10+ exhibitions in galleries, but I mostly focus on showcasing and selling online. Social media has been a fantastic way to engage with collectors, fans, and other artists: 100k+ followers on Instagram and 50k+ spread across TikTok, YouTube, Facebook, and other platforms. I put in a lot of work to my social media, but I also feel very lucky. 

my art studio

The art studio is where you can find me almost all the time—drawing, painting, computer work, packaging online orders, designing new products, social media content creation, planning upcoming projects, murals, and collaborations. 

I’ve set up seven studios since beginning my business; each has been very different. They’ve ranged from a small corner of a bedroom to a shared studio with other artists to a proper gallery storefront, and recently I transformed a large room into my dream art studio. 

There are some quirks in this new space — like the pool table that was too heavy to move. I converted it into a standing desk by putting a plank of wood on top. Underneath is a treadmill so I can walk while doing my emails. 

The studio is set up with lots of specific areas — desk spaces, product stock and print storage, spaces for messy paint and fine drawings, an easel corner. … If you’re interested in seeing, I uploaded two videos about it to YouTube. One is the beginning-to-end process showing setting up the studio from scratch. The second is a studio tour where I show you around the entire space.

“Each person’s life is like a mandala — a vast, limitless circle. We stand in the center of our own circle, and everything we see, hear, and think forms the mandala of our life.”

— Pema Chodron

The last 11 years, I’ve had the absolute honour of having my little dog, George. This past year, he died from a veterinary surgical accident. It was awful … I’ve only just started to recover and reemerge. George was a 5-kg (11 lbs.) toy poodle. He was an amazing little creature. Loved an adventure but mostly just wanted to cuddle! He spent every day in the art studio with me, and he loved his glamorous life of being a pampered art assistant. 

We travelled the world together; I took him everywhere with me, and he was comfortable travelling on planes, cars, boats. Wherever we went, he was happy! I’m heartbroken, but I feel lucky to have had those wonderful 11 years of unconditional love and joy. Give your fluffy babies an extra hug. 

the art meaning

I create contemporary explorations of the mandala and free-flowing artworks. My artwork is inspired by fractals in nature, the ever-repeating patterns found all throughout the natural universe. 

To understand fractals, you can visualise the patterns of a lightning strike and then draw similarities to a branching tree, the nerves in our bodies, and interweaving rivers. 

Once you start noticing these patterns, they start showing up everywhere, reminding us of the connection between the pattern of our skin to that of tree bark to the makeup of our social systems and so forth. 

Fractal patterning allows us to visualise the unbreakable and immense interconnection of humans and nature. A fusion of art, science, nature, mathematics, and people. 

The mandala is one of the most universal symbols that exist in our world  throughout almost all ethnicities and across centuries of art, culture, architecture, science, and, of course, in nature. Cultural examples include the Celtic knots, North American dream catchers, Aztec calendars, and European church windows, to name a few. Natural occurrences include snowflakes, cross-sections of fruit, planets, the iris of the eye, cacti, flower centres, and thousands of other examples.

the art creation

When creating a contemporary exploration of the mandala, I start with a blank page. Using a pencil, ruler, compass (and eraser!), I create a geometric template of lines and circles to be the drawing guide. The more accurate this base is, the better the drawing is. I start in pencil from the centre, sketching shapes, which evolve upon the canvas into an intricate mandala. Once I’m happy with the pencil, I go back with ink and/or sometimes paint, too.

The mandala is characterised by scaling, symmetry, repetition, and circularity. My free-flowing work contrasts this by being freed from any restraints. Still the same essence of shape, pattern, and flow—but spiraling in and out from each other with no rules or boundaries. I love these two practices; they complement each other in a way that lets me explore different creative techniques while still creating a cohesive body of work. 

Mural painting has been a lot of fun. The biggest I’ve painted so far is a 30m painting (98 ft). I was commissioned to paint this in New Zealand, while I was living in Canada. The commission was for five murals, which took six weeks. Being flown all over the world was a goal I had set for my art and career, and I’m still pinching myself that it’s now my reality. 

The iPad Pro has been really helpful to mock up murals, which helps me book clients, as well as drawing sections onto photos of artworks before committing with paint. I’m constantly using my iPhone and MacBook, and they’re a huge part of my art and business. Massive Apple fan here!

advice to other artists

Let’s talk about the romanticisation of being an artist—of course, there are magical experiences and lifestyles that can be lived. But to get there, there are years of blood, sweat, and tears. Countless hours. Lots of instability. Letdowns. Sacrifices. Mental health struggles. When I share the fabulous things I get to do, I think it’s important to speak about the downsides, which are very much part of the same reality.

Art business is complex—but achievable. What I love about focusing on art business is how it engages both sides of your mind. My art mind is full of soul and spirit, no awareness of time. It is egoless, expressive, fulfilling, and deeply emotional. My business mind is strategic, goal-orientated, and fast paced. 

When your art business is supporting you financially, your mind is released from the basic stresses of money, leading to you having more time for creating and making art. It’s cyclical! It’s incredibly motivating when people are interested in purchasing your art; it allows you to continue to innovate as an artist and entrepreneur. 

Every day, I make time for learning, observing, thinking, and creating. This conscious dedication to growth enables my art to continue to evolve and grow through my passions and interests. What does that look like for me? Yoga, reading, visiting art galleries, journaling, taking online courses, caring for my body and mind. My advice to you is to pursue your goals, look after yourself, and persevere every day.

“We should learn to see everyday life as mandala—the luminous fringes of experience which radiate spontaneously from the empty nature of our being. The aspects of our mandala are the day-to-day objects of our life experience
moving in the dance or play
of the universe.”

— Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

hopes, dreams, goals, fears.

In terms of goals, I am so happy with where I am in my art career. I hope to be able to continue this path … but always dreaming to keep going bigger! 

I want to keep developing the concepts in my art and create more intricate and larger artworks. I want to expand the range of my prints and products, keep collaborating with big brands, paint massive murals on buildings, and continue to challenge the idea of what reality can be. I want to share with you, too—so I’ll keep filming and posting weekly videos and produce more online courses. 

What I’m fearful of? I’m scared of losing my work ethic and drive. I don’t really know where it comes from, but I sure hope that it carries on! 

thank you!

Thank you to the team and readers at WHAT Women Create for including me in your magazine! What an amazing place to learn about other creative women.

I’d love to connect with you all! Follow me on social media @fortyonehundred (Instagram, YouTube, TikTok, etc.). Check out my portfolio and online courses on my website: www.fortyonehundred.com.

 

Lizzie Snow Dream Art Studio Tour 2022

Lizzie Snow Art Studio Tour 2021

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