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Stacy Mazzarino Currie

Published:

Life is multi-sensory, and I think this is prominently reflected in my artwork.

I remarried four years ago, sold my home and moved to Morris County, New Jersey (about 25 miles outside of Manhattan) with my husband, Julian, and our blended family. Our house is situated on an acre of property that backs onto the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. It is known for its wonderful wildlife viewing and nature walks. There is something very magical about having a studio so close to the outside; I watch the world go by and feel the energy that surrounds me.

Stacy Mazzarino Currie Sketchbooks

I grew up about an hour away from Morris County in Brooklyn, New York, with a traditional Italian American family; both of my parents are of Italian heritage. I have one younger brother, Joey Mazzarino, who is a writer, puppeteer and director. Even though I only have one brother, I was lucky enough to have grown up surrounded by lots of extended family members and was very close to my paternal grandfather, Joe (who died at the age of 96) and my maternal grandmother, who I feel is my soul mate. My grandmother, Dorothy, was very ahead of her time, wearing pants in a time when most women wore dresses and getting a job when most women were staying home to raise a family. Unlike her sisters who were homemakers, my grandmother worked at Lord & Taylor in the city. One of my favorite stories she used to tell was how she and her brother would go to the speakeasy and line up their drinks at last call. She was a bit of a trailblazer. I dream of her frequently and feel her with me always.

Growing up, I was also close to my uncle who used to regularly take my brother and me to the toy store. I would typically buy a new box of Crayons, a little notebook or a coloring book. My love of paper goes way back, and there is nothing like the smell of a brand new box of Crayola’s, except maybe the smell of Play-Doh! I also fondly remember sewing sock animals with my grandmother. They were very primitive with button eyes and little hats. When my grandmother died, I found some of the puppets we made—she had kept them for all those years!

“We can do no great things, only small things with great love.” – Mother Theresa

I find beauty in little things, like the way colors fade into each other, the smell of a department store perfume counter or the packaging on a bottle of wine. I pay close attention to details, regularly viewing the world through a creative lens. I often feel as if I am part of a movie, walking among the movie set of life, of course, with music playing in the background. I enjoy the energy of nearby New York City, as it is like nowhere else in the world, and readily feeds me to create, whether it be with flowers, music, texture, weather or cooking, etc.

I don’t know if my art is truly definable, as I am sometimes all over the place because there are so many different mediums that I enjoy, but in terms of style, bright colors and childlike joy are common attributes. I was a preschool teacher for many years, and I got a lot of inspiration from my little ones—children are true artists.

I have some of my favorite pieces in my studio. I love antiques and vintage things, such as my ornate lamps, which were in my grandmother’s house since before I was born. I love the ship-lapped walls and use them as a backdrop for hanging my paintings. I have to be surrounded by my favorite things, as this makes me happy and helps me create. We are doing a home renovation in a few months, and my studio will be moved to a different part of my home. I only hope it brings me as much inspiration as this space does now.

You don’t need a big space to create. Not everyone has the luxury of a big area, and there may be other obstacles to work through as well. My porch is not heated or cooled so in the winter it can be a bit of a challenge, but when the sun is strong, even in bad weather, I can get a few hours in my studio. If not, I just move to the dining table. In the summer, I run the risk of my pastels and crayons melting. Wherever you create, just carve out a little section for yourself— a space at the dining table, poolside, under the covers of your bed, wherever you feel most comfortable. Oftentimes during the night, I have one of my many sketchbooks in bed with me, while I draw out ideas or doodle.

Stacy Mazzarino Currie Painting

Sometimes though my mind stops, and I feel burnt out creatively. I used to get upset with myself when this would happen; however, I have learned to be at peace with that feeling. I use this time to be productive in another way; I turn on a podcast and prep my canvases, paint colorful backgrounds for future projects or cut out papers for collage work. My advice to others is to not fight that burned-out feeling; just go with it and before you know it, inspiration will strike again!

Just make sure when inspiration does strike that you have all of your favorite supplies easily accessible, so when the mood strikes, you are ready to create. My motto is, have art supplies, will travel. There is nothing more frustrating than having to start looking for your materials before you can create; it’s a definite hindrance to your creativity. During the summer, I spend lots of time down the shore with my parents, and I always have a little case packed with my favorite supplies. I never travel without them!

For years, I have been seeking to find other creatives. The internet was initially a great way for me to find other like-minded artists and creators. This is where I met Lisa Kettell, a leading expert in the creative arts industry, and we have become really good friends. There is now a whole new world of creative people at my fingertips, many of which I have found through magazines.

Stacy Mazzarino Currie Art Wall

I am currently a Director of Children’s Ministries, and I give back by teaching adult and children’s art classes. It’s a great way to get to know the people in the congregation. Donating time to my community is very important to me. I have been a Cub Scout leader, Girl Scout leader, foster parent, class mother, an active member of the P.T.O. and soup kitchen volunteer. I think this has helped make me into the woman I am today. As Maya Angelou says, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” Offering time to such organizations not only makes me feel good but often helps others feel good as well. Always make people feel good!

Life is multi-sensory, and I think this is prominently reflected in my artwork.

I remarried four years ago, sold my home and moved to Morris County, New Jersey (about 25 miles outside of Manhattan) with my husband, Julian, and our blended family. Our house is situated on an acre of property that backs onto the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. It is known for its wonderful wildlife viewing and nature walks. There is something very magical about having a studio so close to the outside; I watch the world go by and feel the energy that surrounds me.

Stacy Mazzarino Currie Sketchbooks

I grew up about an hour away from Morris County in Brooklyn, New York, with a traditional Italian American family; both of my parents are of Italian heritage. I have one younger brother, Joey Mazzarino, who is a writer, puppeteer and director. Even though I only have one brother, I was lucky enough to have grown up surrounded by lots of extended family members and was very close to my paternal grandfather, Joe (who died at the age of 96) and my maternal grandmother, who I feel is my soul mate. My grandmother, Dorothy, was very ahead of her time, wearing pants in a time when most women wore dresses and getting a job when most women were staying home to raise a family. Unlike her sisters who were homemakers, my grandmother worked at Lord & Taylor in the city. One of my favorite stories she used to tell was how she and her brother would go to the speakeasy and line up their drinks at last call. She was a bit of a trailblazer. I dream of her frequently and feel her with me always.

Growing up, I was also close to my uncle who used to regularly take my brother and me to the toy store. I would typically buy a new box of Crayons, a little notebook or a coloring book. My love of paper goes way back, and there is nothing like the smell of a brand new box of Crayola’s, except maybe the smell of Play-Doh! I also fondly remember sewing sock animals with my grandmother. They were very primitive with button eyes and little hats. When my grandmother died, I found some of the puppets we made—she had kept them for all those years!

“We can do no great things, only small things with great love.” – Mother Theresa

I find beauty in little things, like the way colors fade into each other, the smell of a department store perfume counter or the packaging on a bottle of wine. I pay close attention to details, regularly viewing the world through a creative lens. I often feel as if I am part of a movie, walking among the movie set of life, of course, with music playing in the background. I enjoy the energy of nearby New York City, as it is like nowhere else in the world, and readily feeds me to create, whether it be with flowers, music, texture, weather or cooking, etc.

I don’t know if my art is truly definable, as I am sometimes all over the place because there are so many different mediums that I enjoy, but in terms of style, bright colors and childlike joy are common attributes. I was a preschool teacher for many years, and I got a lot of inspiration from my little ones—children are true artists.

I have some of my favorite pieces in my studio. I love antiques and vintage things, such as my ornate lamps, which were in my grandmother’s house since before I was born. I love the ship-lapped walls and use them as a backdrop for hanging my paintings. I have to be surrounded by my favorite things, as this makes me happy and helps me create. We are doing a home renovation in a few months, and my studio will be moved to a different part of my home. I only hope it brings me as much inspiration as this space does now.

You don’t need a big space to create. Not everyone has the luxury of a big area, and there may be other obstacles to work through as well. My porch is not heated or cooled so in the winter it can be a bit of a challenge, but when the sun is strong, even in bad weather, I can get a few hours in my studio. If not, I just move to the dining table. In the summer, I run the risk of my pastels and crayons melting. Wherever you create, just carve out a little section for yourself— a space at the dining table, poolside, under the covers of your bed, wherever you feel most comfortable. Oftentimes during the night, I have one of my many sketchbooks in bed with me, while I draw out ideas or doodle.

Stacy Mazzarino Currie Painting

Sometimes though my mind stops, and I feel burnt out creatively. I used to get upset with myself when this would happen; however, I have learned to be at peace with that feeling. I use this time to be productive in another way; I turn on a podcast and prep my canvases, paint colorful backgrounds for future projects or cut out papers for collage work. My advice to others is to not fight that burned-out feeling; just go with it and before you know it, inspiration will strike again!

Just make sure when inspiration does strike that you have all of your favorite supplies easily accessible, so when the mood strikes, you are ready to create. My motto is, have art supplies, will travel. There is nothing more frustrating than having to start looking for your materials before you can create; it’s a definite hindrance to your creativity. During the summer, I spend lots of time down the shore with my parents, and I always have a little case packed with my favorite supplies. I never travel without them!

For years, I have been seeking to find other creatives. The internet was initially a great way for me to find other like-minded artists and creators. This is where I met Lisa Kettell, a leading expert in the creative arts industry, and we have become really good friends. There is now a whole new world of creative people at my fingertips, many of which I have found through magazines.

Stacy Mazzarino Currie Art Wall

I am currently a Director of Children’s Ministries, and I give back by teaching adult and children’s art classes. It’s a great way to get to know the people in the congregation. Donating time to my community is very important to me. I have been a Cub Scout leader, Girl Scout leader, foster parent, class mother, an active member of the P.T.O. and soup kitchen volunteer. I think this has helped make me into the woman I am today. As Maya Angelou says, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” Offering time to such organizations not only makes me feel good but often helps others feel good as well. Always make people feel good!