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Tamar Mogendorff

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Tamar Mogendorff

I grew up in Israel in a kibbutz, and later, in Jerusalem where I went to art school before moving to New York. When I was very young, I used to make wooden boats with my father. They were very simple with just a few pieces of wood connected to one another, along with an attached rope. Together, we would take them to the stream nearby and float them off of a bridge. I still have a few of them in my studio and find them beautiful.

Collections of artifacts, art, and objects all excite me. My passion for creating is ignited when I find new material or fabric. I gain motivation to create through many things including a mere color, a flower or even a random moment—they inspire something in me to go to the studio and create.

Tamar Mogendorff

I moved to my current studio ten years ago—a space in an old building. It has a lot of character, and I didn’t want to change a thing. It has a low ceiling with wood beams, which is perfect for my work, as I have so much to hang. With time, I have added additional shelves to make the space more efficient. It looks different every day with whatever is in the studio at any given moment, be it swans, camels, owls, penguins, mermaids, shells etc.

“There is a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in”

— Leonard Cohen

We all have different needs and different ways of working. Besides the practicality of my studio space fulfilling basic needs, such as space and materials, it is important to me that it also feels like my sanctuary.

Tamar Mogendorff

In the beginning, I had to gain some confidence in my own original work and not get confused with other styles surrounding me, though it was always there. It just takes time to realize your aesthetic and to trust it.

I find that once I start to work with fabrics and make objects, the style is just there; style is something that is in you as you create, like an instinct.

Through my work, I continuously meet other creative individuals, such as designers, artists and small business owners. Besides getting their occasional input, I enjoy seeing their processes and how they work. This includes collaborating, which is the most inspiring to me. I am regularly trying to learn new techniques and throw myself into new adventures, which allows me to keep being creative and raw. When your passion is also your job, it can sometimes be very hard to keep a balance.

Tamar Mogendorff

It is important to cherish the moment of inspiration no matter how small and just start…start making. Do not think too much about what it will be or if it’s “good”. Just do your own thing, your own way and later start to edit and refine.

Tamar Mogendorff

P.S. I LOVE THIS
I still have the first birdcage I ever made, which I keep in my studio. It was a special moment when I realized that there is so much I can create and imagine yet, at the same time, it can be made so simple.

Tamar Mogendorff

I grew up in Israel in a kibbutz, and later, in Jerusalem where I went to art school before moving to New York. When I was very young, I used to make wooden boats with my father. They were very simple with just a few pieces of wood connected to one another, along with an attached rope. Together, we would take them to the stream nearby and float them off of a bridge. I still have a few of them in my studio and find them beautiful.

Collections of artifacts, art, and objects all excite me. My passion for creating is ignited when I find new material or fabric. I gain motivation to create through many things including a mere color, a flower or even a random moment—they inspire something in me to go to the studio and create.

Tamar Mogendorff

I moved to my current studio ten years ago—a space in an old building. It has a lot of character, and I didn’t want to change a thing. It has a low ceiling with wood beams, which is perfect for my work, as I have so much to hang. With time, I have added additional shelves to make the space more efficient. It looks different every day with whatever is in the studio at any given moment, be it swans, camels, owls, penguins, mermaids, shells etc.

“There is a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in”

— Leonard Cohen

We all have different needs and different ways of working. Besides the practicality of my studio space fulfilling basic needs, such as space and materials, it is important to me that it also feels like my sanctuary.

Tamar Mogendorff

In the beginning, I had to gain some confidence in my own original work and not get confused with other styles surrounding me, though it was always there. It just takes time to realize your aesthetic and to trust it.

I find that once I start to work with fabrics and make objects, the style is just there; style is something that is in you as you create, like an instinct.

Through my work, I continuously meet other creative individuals, such as designers, artists and small business owners. Besides getting their occasional input, I enjoy seeing their processes and how they work. This includes collaborating, which is the most inspiring to me. I am regularly trying to learn new techniques and throw myself into new adventures, which allows me to keep being creative and raw. When your passion is also your job, it can sometimes be very hard to keep a balance.

Tamar Mogendorff

It is important to cherish the moment of inspiration no matter how small and just start…start making. Do not think too much about what it will be or if it’s “good”. Just do your own thing, your own way and later start to edit and refine.

Tamar Mogendorff

P.S. I LOVE THIS
I still have the first birdcage I ever made, which I keep in my studio. It was a special moment when I realized that there is so much I can create and imagine yet, at the same time, it can be made so simple.

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