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Jason Parker Counce

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I was fortunate to grow up in Hermitage, Tennessee, just outside of Nashville. Beside Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage estate was my grandfather’s family farm with fields of produce and flowers. My mother told me there used to be a historic log home on that site where she grew up, right next to the old oak tree where we had our swing.

I cannot recall a time when I was not making something. As soon as I could get up on a chair, my grandmother taught me to cook, sew, garden, paint, sculpt, throw pottery and quilt. I even helped her restore a vintage car. Looking back at it, I think learning all of these skills allowed me to become the well-rounded individual I am today.

Jason Parker Counce Portrait

Viewing the world creatively has continually given me my initiative. Being the best person you can be, in any capacity, makes you and the world a better place in which to live. Creating, for me, involves the physical act of fabricating or transforming items. It was instilled in me at such an early age that I find it better to make what I need than to simply purchase it in a store. The result is also more unique. That is why I started making folk art; recreating and repurposing from cloth, wood, tin and clay that puts a smile on your face.

I tend to look back at history to find my inspiration. I like all things Americana whether it is an old flag, hand-stitched quilt or vintage painted furniture. I’m known for using antique fabrics, particularly old ticking. Being located in “Music City,” I am able to find creativity in many forms for added inspiration. There is a community that hosts galleries and shows that promote all types of artists. I’m involved with several antique and farmhouse shows, which allow me to see the people enjoy what we present. Shoppers also help to promote us by buying unique items to take home and enjoy.

I have been told that I am regularly reinventing myself; keeping up with the latest trends. I sometimes feel like I have come up with the newest “it” item, but the public just doesn’t yet know it. I feel it is important to keep up with trends but to approach them with one’s unique point of view.

Recycling items from our past to present them for our future is an important aspect of why I create.

As everyone knows, your studio is a place to create and experiment. I started out with what I definitely required: a table for my sewing machine, cupboards for supplies and baskets to hold finished and unfinished products. Most of all, I need a place to store all of my “stuff”. It has definitely changed over the years. I’ve learned to not hold on to everything. As every artist and dealer knows, there is a very fine line between collecting and hoarding. Sometimes, it is time to move on and get rid of old art supplies like glitter and pipe cleaners. I find donating to art programs at churches and schools to be very rewarding.

 

Over time, I have figured out how to group like items together for easier storage and location. A stack of graduated suitcases hide lots of items and look good. An old wooden cupboard with open shelves becomes a storage space for antique folded fabric. Even using a cart that moves around easily while working on projects helps at times.

There is never enough space, and this in itself can be a big challenge. I am usually creating several items at once, so it’s basically factory work with several tables set up to work like an assembly line. I am known for making all sorts of holiday items. If I am working on ornaments, get out of my way—as there are literally dozens to be made!

Jason Parker Counce Living Room

It is also important to stick to your tried-and-true items. Surround yourself with things that inspire what you make. I have an iron bed that was mine as a child set up as a daybed. It is covered in quilts and pillows that I’ve made out of antique cloth—reinforcing my love for Americana.

I get my biggest sense of accomplishment when I complete each show and season, creating new and exciting items for homes. Looking into the future can be as simple as what you find on hand; which can dictate your creativity. For this reason, I surround myself with fabrics and antiques that can easily inspire and serve as the basis for the next “Aha” moment!

To make and makeover things are the essence of an artist.

I was fortunate to grow up in Hermitage, Tennessee, just outside of Nashville. Beside Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage estate was my grandfather’s family farm with fields of produce and flowers. My mother told me there used to be a historic log home on that site where she grew up, right next to the old oak tree where we had our swing.

I cannot recall a time when I was not making something. As soon as I could get up on a chair, my grandmother taught me to cook, sew, garden, paint, sculpt, throw pottery and quilt. I even helped her restore a vintage car. Looking back at it, I think learning all of these skills allowed me to become the well-rounded individual I am today.

Jason Parker Counce Portrait

Viewing the world creatively has continually given me my initiative. Being the best person you can be, in any capacity, makes you and the world a better place in which to live. Creating, for me, involves the physical act of fabricating or transforming items. It was instilled in me at such an early age that I find it better to make what I need than to simply purchase it in a store. The result is also more unique. That is why I started making folk art; recreating and repurposing from cloth, wood, tin and clay that puts a smile on your face.

I tend to look back at history to find my inspiration. I like all things Americana whether it is an old flag, hand-stitched quilt or vintage painted furniture. I’m known for using antique fabrics, particularly old ticking. Being located in “Music City,” I am able to find creativity in many forms for added inspiration. There is a community that hosts galleries and shows that promote all types of artists. I’m involved with several antique and farmhouse shows, which allow me to see the people enjoy what we present. Shoppers also help to promote us by buying unique items to take home and enjoy.

I have been told that I am regularly reinventing myself; keeping up with the latest trends. I sometimes feel like I have come up with the newest “it” item, but the public just doesn’t yet know it. I feel it is important to keep up with trends but to approach them with one’s unique point of view.

Recycling items from our past to present them for our future is an important aspect of why I create.

As everyone knows, your studio is a place to create and experiment. I started out with what I definitely required: a table for my sewing machine, cupboards for supplies and baskets to hold finished and unfinished products. Most of all, I need a place to store all of my “stuff”. It has definitely changed over the years. I’ve learned to not hold on to everything. As every artist and dealer knows, there is a very fine line between collecting and hoarding. Sometimes, it is time to move on and get rid of old art supplies like glitter and pipe cleaners. I find donating to art programs at churches and schools to be very rewarding.

 

Over time, I have figured out how to group like items together for easier storage and location. A stack of graduated suitcases hide lots of items and look good. An old wooden cupboard with open shelves becomes a storage space for antique folded fabric. Even using a cart that moves around easily while working on projects helps at times.

There is never enough space, and this in itself can be a big challenge. I am usually creating several items at once, so it’s basically factory work with several tables set up to work like an assembly line. I am known for making all sorts of holiday items. If I am working on ornaments, get out of my way—as there are literally dozens to be made!

Jason Parker Counce Living Room

It is also important to stick to your tried-and-true items. Surround yourself with things that inspire what you make. I have an iron bed that was mine as a child set up as a daybed. It is covered in quilts and pillows that I’ve made out of antique cloth—reinforcing my love for Americana.

I get my biggest sense of accomplishment when I complete each show and season, creating new and exciting items for homes. Looking into the future can be as simple as what you find on hand; which can dictate your creativity. For this reason, I surround myself with fabrics and antiques that can easily inspire and serve as the basis for the next “Aha” moment!

To make and makeover things are the essence of an artist.