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Corinne Bernizet Serrano

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Corinne Bernizet Serrano

I live in a town called Le Pont de Beauvoisin located in the Northern Alps in a region of France called Northern Isere (Nord Isère). I was born in this region, in the mountains. In 1995, we bought the house that we currently live in after my husband took a post as an anaesthetist in the local hospital.

My home is an old mansion in the heart of our village and dates back to 1850. We fell in love with the high ceilings and spacious living spaces, as well as, the beautiful mature gardens that surround the house. It is a magical haven at the centre of a bustling town. Once we bought the house we undertook eight straight months of renovation work before we could move in, and as with any old house, it is a constant work in progress. There is always something to be fixed and upgraded.

Corinne Bernizet Serrano

I left my career after the birth of my eldest child (I have three daughters), and I took fifteen years ‘out’ to raise my daughters. When my youngest, Jeanne, was about seven years old, I enrolled in the Chamber of Crafts as an artisan. When I look back, I had always been very dexterous and creative throughout my life, and I slowly started ‘to make’ again. At the start, I was approached by a local boutique that wished to sell my earliest creations, and then when that boutique closed, I found myself focusing on my blog and selling work online in my own personal online shop.

The act of making and creating with my hands and practicing daily creativity has always held a primordial place in my life. As far back as I can remember, I have loved ‘having my hands in the glue’. And, from a very young age, I recall creating my own toys to play with, tinkering away to create my own little universe. I believe that growing up in the countryside facilitated this creative path; I could always create something out of nature’s finds.

Corinne Bernizet Serrano

Later in life, I threw myself into an exciting series of apprenticeships to learn and master many different heritage and specialist techniques. I completed intensive workshops to learn how to create lampshades. I learned how to dye textiles using natural plant dyes in Okhra in Roussillon, how to create and apply lime plaster at “La Marchande de Couleurs” in Montelier, participated in a long apprenticeship to master the grisaille painting technique at the Versailles School of Mural Art, and worked as an apprentice to learn the art of mold making with Pascal Rozier in the Paris region. I have loved each and every apprenticeship, and I can use and apply these skills in every element of my work today.

My one big regret in life is having missed the opportunity to study Fine Arts. When I broached the subject of studying art at the university level when I was younger, my family discouraged me, wishing for me to study something more ‘serious’ and ‘secure’. I have tried to make up for this by making time every week to paint. I attend a painting workshop every Thursday evening and have done so for the last seven years. I am truly happy when I have my paintbrushes close at hand and have relished finding my voice through this medium of expression. I’m currently throwing myself into painting using the technique of ‘trompe l’oeil’, and I love it.

Corinne Bernizet Serrano

Another of my passions is to treasure hunt at the flea markets and village garage sales; I will go hunting everywhere and for everything. I passionately go out looking for treasures every single weekend. For decades now, I have been particularly interested in finding and collecting old paper and textiles, and I hold a special relationship with these two subjects, which in the end have a lot in common.

Fabric and paper are the key ingredients of my creative work, and often, I feel that it is they that guide my hand when I sit down to make.  Textile and paper touch all of the senses; touching sight, sound and of course smell. I succumb to the smell of an old book buried for centuries in a library or the delicious cracking sound of a beautiful 18th century silk. The fragility of these incredible materials is also very interesting to me; to know the centuries they have traversed. Their very nature makes them so vulnerable, and this touches me immensely and also provides a wonderful challenge for me when working to breathe new life into them.

Corinne Bernizet Serrano

The corsets and shoes that I create entirely by hand is a good example of my primary work with paper and textiles. Working on these pieces calls to play many of my heritage skills. I create the base in a delicate papier-mâché and then finish my work using precious ancient textiles and lace. I have recently started to use very beautiful old hand embroidery on linen or batiste. In transforming these textiles, it is my personal way of honouring the many little hands of the people who have poured their hearts into this incredibly fine work all those centuries ago.

Today life is lived at such a fast pace, handmade is not so important, and it is more about making cheaply and quickly, a terrible era of fast, throwaway fashion. My work, however, is fastidious and slow-paced, and I enjoy taking my time with it. Working with art has become very meditative and therapeutic for me, helping me slow down.

“It is not the detail of a particular style that counts, but the sensitivity that comes into play beforehand.”

—John Pawson

My creations are a real mix of many different styles and influences. I am personally drawn to refined and delicate objects, though I do not believe I have a particular signature style. I do, however, very much like the Napoleon III style period with all its extravagance and rococo flair!

Most of my creations are one-of-a-kind pieces, as I work with ancient materials often only work with small remnants of fabric or paper, so by nature, I cannot make more than one or two. It is never a hindrance to me; I actually welcome change, as I don’t really like repetition nor making an identical series of items. This type of work becomes too monotonous for me, and there is no spontaneity; the excitement of creating something for the first time is gone. I love the challenge and novelty of creating from scratch.

My very popular crown created from an ancient hemp fabric is undoubtedly my biggest success. I have sold many of my handmade crowns to French clients, but I do believe that my crown creations have found homes in every continent of the world. I am humbled, proud and astonished in equal measure at their international success. Since their modest beginnings, my crowns have been created in many different versions. Sometimes, I have used precious fabrics, embroidery, and lace, but also, 18th century paper manuscripts, the spines of old leather books, 19th century cashmere and many other materials. The crown is a shape that I really love to revisit.

P.S. I LOVE THIS!
I love all kinds of boxes, and they are often a wonderful base onto which I can showcase my collection of beautiful old hand-painted gouache wallpapers. I make boxes myself, but I also collect ancient wallpapered boxes and trunks. I like to envision my handmade boxes going out into the world, along with the cherished treasures they will contain, out in their new owners’ homes.

Corinne Bernizet Serrano

Corinne Bernizet Serrano

I live in a town called Le Pont de Beauvoisin located in the Northern Alps in a region of France called Northern Isere (Nord Isère). I was born in this region, in the mountains. In 1995, we bought the house that we currently live in after my husband took a post as an anaesthetist in the local hospital.

My home is an old mansion in the heart of our village and dates back to 1850. We fell in love with the high ceilings and spacious living spaces, as well as, the beautiful mature gardens that surround the house. It is a magical haven at the centre of a bustling town. Once we bought the house we undertook eight straight months of renovation work before we could move in, and as with any old house, it is a constant work in progress. There is always something to be fixed and upgraded.

Corinne Bernizet Serrano

I left my career after the birth of my eldest child (I have three daughters), and I took fifteen years ‘out’ to raise my daughters. When my youngest, Jeanne, was about seven years old, I enrolled in the Chamber of Crafts as an artisan. When I look back, I had always been very dexterous and creative throughout my life, and I slowly started ‘to make’ again. At the start, I was approached by a local boutique that wished to sell my earliest creations, and then when that boutique closed, I found myself focusing on my blog and selling work online in my own personal online shop.

The act of making and creating with my hands and practicing daily creativity has always held a primordial place in my life. As far back as I can remember, I have loved ‘having my hands in the glue’. And, from a very young age, I recall creating my own toys to play with, tinkering away to create my own little universe. I believe that growing up in the countryside facilitated this creative path; I could always create something out of nature’s finds.

Corinne Bernizet Serrano

Later in life, I threw myself into an exciting series of apprenticeships to learn and master many different heritage and specialist techniques. I completed intensive workshops to learn how to create lampshades. I learned how to dye textiles using natural plant dyes in Okhra in Roussillon, how to create and apply lime plaster at “La Marchande de Couleurs” in Montelier, participated in a long apprenticeship to master the grisaille painting technique at the Versailles School of Mural Art, and worked as an apprentice to learn the art of mold making with Pascal Rozier in the Paris region. I have loved each and every apprenticeship, and I can use and apply these skills in every element of my work today.

My one big regret in life is having missed the opportunity to study Fine Arts. When I broached the subject of studying art at the university level when I was younger, my family discouraged me, wishing for me to study something more ‘serious’ and ‘secure’. I have tried to make up for this by making time every week to paint. I attend a painting workshop every Thursday evening and have done so for the last seven years. I am truly happy when I have my paintbrushes close at hand and have relished finding my voice through this medium of expression. I’m currently throwing myself into painting using the technique of ‘trompe l’oeil’, and I love it.

Corinne Bernizet Serrano

Another of my passions is to treasure hunt at the flea markets and village garage sales; I will go hunting everywhere and for everything. I passionately go out looking for treasures every single weekend. For decades now, I have been particularly interested in finding and collecting old paper and textiles, and I hold a special relationship with these two subjects, which in the end have a lot in common.

Fabric and paper are the key ingredients of my creative work, and often, I feel that it is they that guide my hand when I sit down to make.  Textile and paper touch all of the senses; touching sight, sound and of course smell. I succumb to the smell of an old book buried for centuries in a library or the delicious cracking sound of a beautiful 18th century silk. The fragility of these incredible materials is also very interesting to me; to know the centuries they have traversed. Their very nature makes them so vulnerable, and this touches me immensely and also provides a wonderful challenge for me when working to breathe new life into them.

Corinne Bernizet Serrano

The corsets and shoes that I create entirely by hand is a good example of my primary work with paper and textiles. Working on these pieces calls to play many of my heritage skills. I create the base in a delicate papier-mâché and then finish my work using precious ancient textiles and lace. I have recently started to use very beautiful old hand embroidery on linen or batiste. In transforming these textiles, it is my personal way of honouring the many little hands of the people who have poured their hearts into this incredibly fine work all those centuries ago.

Today life is lived at such a fast pace, handmade is not so important, and it is more about making cheaply and quickly, a terrible era of fast, throwaway fashion. My work, however, is fastidious and slow-paced, and I enjoy taking my time with it. Working with art has become very meditative and therapeutic for me, helping me slow down.

“It is not the detail of a particular style that counts, but the sensitivity that comes into play beforehand.”

—John Pawson

My creations are a real mix of many different styles and influences. I am personally drawn to refined and delicate objects, though I do not believe I have a particular signature style. I do, however, very much like the Napoleon III style period with all its extravagance and rococo flair!

Most of my creations are one-of-a-kind pieces, as I work with ancient materials often only work with small remnants of fabric or paper, so by nature, I cannot make more than one or two. It is never a hindrance to me; I actually welcome change, as I don’t really like repetition nor making an identical series of items. This type of work becomes too monotonous for me, and there is no spontaneity; the excitement of creating something for the first time is gone. I love the challenge and novelty of creating from scratch.

My very popular crown created from an ancient hemp fabric is undoubtedly my biggest success. I have sold many of my handmade crowns to French clients, but I do believe that my crown creations have found homes in every continent of the world. I am humbled, proud and astonished in equal measure at their international success. Since their modest beginnings, my crowns have been created in many different versions. Sometimes, I have used precious fabrics, embroidery, and lace, but also, 18th century paper manuscripts, the spines of old leather books, 19th century cashmere and many other materials. The crown is a shape that I really love to revisit.

P.S. I LOVE THIS!
I love all kinds of boxes, and they are often a wonderful base onto which I can showcase my collection of beautiful old hand-painted gouache wallpapers. I make boxes myself, but I also collect ancient wallpapered boxes and trunks. I like to envision my handmade boxes going out into the world, along with the cherished treasures they will contain, out in their new owners’ homes.

Corinne Bernizet Serrano

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