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Hobie Dog & Teri Drobnick

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My human, Teri, is a writer and creator. I adore working with Teri in our sunroom studio—the warmth of the sunlight streams through the climbing wisteria branches just outside the windows. While writing, Teri often reads her manuscript aloud. The sound of her melodic reading is soothing as it enters my furry, floppy ears. If I don’t whine or bark in response, she knows I am pleased with the result.

Teri and I recently co-wrote a children’s picture book, which her agent has sent out to publishers on submission. It will be our first co-authored piece, so I am ex-tre-me-ly excited. When I am not participating in the writing process, I lay at Teri’s feet under her reclaimed wood desk—the cool hard floor pressed against my cheek. I prefer to be as close as possible, so she can easily reach down to pet me, or better yet—provide a belly rub.

“They [dogs] never talk about themselves but listen to you while you talk about yourself and keep up an appearance of being interested in the conversation.” —JEROME K. JEROME

When Teri is creating her TEEsox rag dolls, she always asks my opinion on which color or fabric to utilize for a particular “pet”. You see, Teri’s rag dolls are actually animals: dogs, cats, bunnies, bears and the occasional frog. I call them my pets. It is difficult for me to participate in the actual sewing process, so Teri presents fabric options for me to determine outfits for the dolls. If I tilt my head to the side, she knows that I approve of her choice. When I lay down, sigh and place my paws over my eyes—that’s a definite NO.

The pets are all made from reclaimed clothing, so we feel pleased about contributing to the sustainability movement. We sell our pets on-line, in boutiques and at art shows—annoyingly I am never invited. So, my favorite sale is when a grandmother brings their grandchild to our studio to pick out a TEEsox in person. The child caresses and snuggles each TEEsox carefully and, after testing the animal’s dancing capabilities, makes their final choice. Their pet is then named. One little girl chose a bunny and named it “Froggie.” Even though I become exceedingly attached to my pets, I am happy to know that they are going to a good home. Even more important, I’m pleased they will be loved.

When the workday is done and dinner is complete, I curl up on the couch next to Teri, with my comfy flannel quilt. My human and I make a marvelous team. She thinks she’s the boss of our business, but we all know who the real alpha is!

My human, Teri, is a writer and creator. I adore working with Teri in our sunroom studio—the warmth of the sunlight streams through the climbing wisteria branches just outside the windows. While writing, Teri often reads her manuscript aloud. The sound of her melodic reading is soothing as it enters my furry, floppy ears. If I don’t whine or bark in response, she knows I am pleased with the result.

Teri and I recently co-wrote a children’s picture book, which her agent has sent out to publishers on submission. It will be our first co-authored piece, so I am ex-tre-me-ly excited. When I am not participating in the writing process, I lay at Teri’s feet under her reclaimed wood desk—the cool hard floor pressed against my cheek. I prefer to be as close as possible, so she can easily reach down to pet me, or better yet—provide a belly rub.

“They [dogs] never talk about themselves but listen to you while you talk about yourself and keep up an appearance of being interested in the conversation.” —JEROME K. JEROME

When Teri is creating her TEEsox rag dolls, she always asks my opinion on which color or fabric to utilize for a particular “pet”. You see, Teri’s rag dolls are actually animals: dogs, cats, bunnies, bears and the occasional frog. I call them my pets. It is difficult for me to participate in the actual sewing process, so Teri presents fabric options for me to determine outfits for the dolls. If I tilt my head to the side, she knows that I approve of her choice. When I lay down, sigh and place my paws over my eyes—that’s a definite NO.

The pets are all made from reclaimed clothing, so we feel pleased about contributing to the sustainability movement. We sell our pets on-line, in boutiques and at art shows—annoyingly I am never invited. So, my favorite sale is when a grandmother brings their grandchild to our studio to pick out a TEEsox in person. The child caresses and snuggles each TEEsox carefully and, after testing the animal’s dancing capabilities, makes their final choice. Their pet is then named. One little girl chose a bunny and named it “Froggie.” Even though I become exceedingly attached to my pets, I am happy to know that they are going to a good home. Even more important, I’m pleased they will be loved.

When the workday is done and dinner is complete, I curl up on the couch next to Teri, with my comfy flannel quilt. My human and I make a marvelous team. She thinks she’s the boss of our business, but we all know who the real alpha is!